Cowboy Caviar {Black-eyed Pea Salsa} aka Texas Caviar

Cowboy Caviar {black-eyed Pea Salsa} aka Texas Caviar is the delicious Southern cousin of Mexican Black Bean Salsa made with black-eyed peas, sweet corn, diced red plum tomatoes, chopped spicy jalapeño peppers, crisp celery, diced cucumber, red onions, finely sliced green onion, chopped fresh cilantro, and served with crunchy tortilla chips.

Southerners love their black-eyed peas, and the state of Texas is the birthplace of Cowboy Caviar {Black-eyed Pea Salsa} aka Texas Caviar. Cowboy Caviar aka Texas Caviar was created in the lovely state of Texas around 1940, by Ms. Helen Corbitt, the director of the food service for the Zodiac Room at Neiman Marcus in Dallas, Texas. Here’s the twist Y’all, Ms. Helen Corbitt was actually a native of New York, not Texas.Cowboy Caviar {black-eyed Pea Salsa} aka Texas Caviar is the delicious Southern cousin of Mexican Black Bean Salsa made with black-eyed peas, sweet corn, diced red plum tomatoes, chopped spicy jalapeño peppers, crisp celery, diced cucumber, red onions, finely sliced green onion, chopped fresh cilantro, and served with crunchy tortilla chips. I don’t know about y’ all but I can surely forgive Ms. Corbitt for not being a native Southerner, since she created one of my favorite Southern iconic appetizers; bless her little heart, if it weren’t for her we might not have ever thought of this amazing concoction made from black-eyed peas on our own. So a big thank you is going out to that lovely fiery redheaded Northern gal.

Ms. Helen Corbitt was notoriously famous for being the director of the food service at the Zodiac Room, in the Neiman Marcus in Dallas, Texas. She first served her well-known Black-eyed Pea Salsa on New Year’s Eve at the Houston Country Club. Ms. Corbitt, would later also serve the Black-eyed Pea Salsa at the famous Driskill Hotel in Austin, Texas, where then dubbed by its nickname, “Texas caviar,” as a humorous poke at real caviar, an expensive hors-d’oeuvre of salt-cured fish roe.

 

 

Cowboy Caviar {black-eyed Pea Salsa} aka Texas Caviar is the delicious Southern cousin of Mexican Black Bean Salsa made with black-eyed peas, sweet corn, diced red plum tomatoes, chopped spicy jalapeño peppers, crisp celery, diced cucumber, red onions, finely sliced green onion, chopped fresh cilantro, and served with crunchy tortilla chips.Did you know, Mr. Stanley Marcus had once declared Ms. Helen Corbitt the creator of Texas Caviar,  “The Balenciaga of Food”? While Mr. Earl Wilson would describe her simply as “The best cook in Texas.Ms.Helen Corbitt has been said to be to the American’s what Julia Child is considered to be the French. Ms. Corbitt’s forte was in her exquisite presentation of new and unusual flavor combinations, and vibrant colors like you will notice her famous Cowboy Caviar {Black-eyed Pea Salsa} aka Texas Caviar

 

 

Cowboy Caviar {black-eyed Pea Salsa} aka Texas Caviar is the delicious Southern cousin of Mexican Black Bean Salsa made with black-eyed peas, sweet corn, diced red plum tomatoes, chopped spicy jalapeño peppers, crisp celery, diced cucumber, red onions, finely sliced green onion, chopped fresh cilantro, and served with crunchy tortilla chips.Among her most famous food creations like her Texas Caviar, are her famous Snowballs recipe, Flowerpots with Baked Alaska recipe made in small clay pots, and poppy-seed Dressing. Did you know that Helen would be credited with creating this amazing Poppy-seed Dressing but denied the accolades due to only making the recipe popular over the years?

You’ll find many versions of this wonderful tasting Cowboy Caviar {Black-eyed Pea Salsa} aka Texas Caviar on the web, but here is my favorite way to make this fabulous appetizer. Just be prepared for it to fly off the table in no time. Serve it with crisp tortilla chips and watch the family dig in.

 

 

Cowboy Caviar {black-eyed Pea Salsa} aka Texas Caviar is the delicious Southern cousin of Mexican Black Bean Salsa made with black-eyed peas, sweet corn, diced red plum tomatoes, chopped spicy jalapeño peppers, crisp celery, diced cucumber, red onions, finely sliced green onion, chopped fresh cilantro, and served with crunchy tortilla chips.

 

 

 

 

Cowboy Caviar {Black-eyed Pea Salsa} aka Texas Caviar

  • 2 cups black-eyed peas well-drained
  • 1 cup of corn
  • 1/2 cup of black beans, drained
  • 2 plum tomatoes, seeded and diced
  • 3 jalapeño peppers finely chopped
  • 2 stalks of celery diced
  • 1 small red onion diced
  • 1/4 of a cup of diced cucumber
  • 2 tablespoons minced fresh cilantro, minced
  • 3 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons of olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons of sugar. optional
  • a dash of cayenne pepper
  • kosher salt, to own taste
  • freshly ground black pepper, to own taste

 

 

 

 

5 from 14 votes
Cowboy Caviar {black-eyed Pea Salsa} aka Texas Caviar is the delicious Southern cousin of Mexican Black Bean Salsa made with black-eyed peas, sweet corn, diced red plum tomatoes, chopped spicy jalapeño peppers, crisp celery, diced cucumber, red onions, finely sliced green onion, chopped fresh cilantro, and served with crunchy tortilla chips.
Cowboy Caviar {Black-eyed Pea Salsa} aka Texas Caviar
Prep Time
25 mins
chill
30 mins
Total Time
25 mins
 
Cowboy Caviar {black-eyed Pea Salsa} aka Texas Caviar is the delicious Southern cousin of Mexican Black Bean Salsa made with black-eyed peas, sweet corn, diced red plum tomatoes, chopped spicy jalapeño peppers, crisp celery, diced cucumber, red onions, finely sliced green onion, chopped fresh cilantro, and served with crunchy tortilla chips.
Course: Appetizer
Cuisine: American, Southern
Keyword: Black-eyed Peas Salasa, Cowboy Caviar, Texas Caviar
Servings: 8
Calories: 265 kcal
Author: hmccallum
Ingredients
  • 2 cups Black-eyed peas well-drained
  • 1 cup Sweet Organic Corn
  • 1/2 cup Black beans drained
  • 2 Plum tomatoes seeded and diced
  • 3 Jalapeño peppers finely chopped
  • 2 ribs Celery diced
  • 1 Red onion diced
  • 1/4 cup Cucumber diced
  • 3 tablespoons Fresh cilantro Chopped
  • 3 tablespoons Apple cider vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons Olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons Sugar
  • pinch Cayenne pepper
  • Kosher salt to own taste
  • Freshly ground black pepper to own taste
Instructions
  1. You can either use a quality canned black-eyed pea, black bean or corn in the recipe, however, be sure to rinse and drain the beans and corn before adding to the bowl.
  2. Next, add diced plum tomatoes, diced jalapeño (peppers seeds are optional), diced celery, diced red onion, diced cucumber, and fresh cilantro to the bowl.
  3. In a small bowl combine apple cider vinegar, olive oil, cayenne pepper, kosher salt, and freshly ground black pepper.
  4. Add the mixture to the large bowl and toss the ingredients to combine.
  5. Refrigerate for 3 hours before serving with tortilla chips.
  6. Enjoy.
Recipe Notes

Best if chilled 3 hours or more

 

 

 

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Cowboy Caviar {black-eyed Pea Salsa} aka Texas Caviar is the delicious Southern cousin of Mexican Black Bean Salsa made with black-eyed peas, sweet corn, diced red plum tomatoes, chopped spicy jalapeño peppers, crisp celery, diced cucumber, red onions, finely sliced green onion, chopped fresh cilantro, and served with crunchy tortilla chips.

 

 

26 thoughts on “Cowboy Caviar {Black-eyed Pea Salsa} aka Texas Caviar”

  • Just wanted to thank you for sharing such awesome recipes when it comes to traditional Southern Foods. It’s so hard to find authentic recipes that haven’t been mutilated by some jack rabbit who isn’t from the South and put their own spin on it without understanding the recipe because they have never seen it let alone eaten it. I think they should just stick to what they know and stop jumping on the bandwagon with Southern foods.

    • Good morning Fait, I too understand your frustration. I stick to family recipes that I am familiar with and try not to adlib to them unless necessary. I am sorry you have had this experience with other blogs.

  • I am laughing so hard at Faith above me because I too have been getting pissed with the parade of bullshit Southern recipes. I just noticed one the other day for this recipe specifically made with black beans and all the shit you would use for a black bean salsa. That’s not even close. Call it what it is Black Bean Salsa. The worst are Gumbo recipes that aren’t even Gumbo.

    • Hey there, Britteny, I actually saw something similar myself the other day, I try to stay clear of bloggers who do that, I know they mean well, but I want authentic, not creative. Gumbo has been one of the recipes I see murdered on a constant basis, also Jambalaya. Thanks for stopping by.

  • This recipe was great and I love the story behind it. Nice to see a Southerner give credit where credit is due. Glad to also see you kept it traditional and not all the awkward spins added to it. I like creative work but sometimes just want reality.

  • I made this and my family enjoyed it. Living in Texas we eat this on so many things. It’s great on salad believe it or not. I also like it to top chicken.

    • Marrietta, thank you for the sweet comment. You know I have heard of people topping the chicken with it, but the salad idea seems interesting. I bet it would be really good.

  • This is a gorgeous recipe for Cowboy Caviar! I just happen to have some black-eyed peas in my pantry and can’t wait to make this! I think I will add it to may mother’s day menu. My mom will love it!

  • This looks so tasty! I have to admit, I’m one of those Northerners who has jumped on the Southern food wagon (sorry, not sorry ) – but how could I not? The food is amazing, and I come from a family of Southerners who raised me on the good stuff!

    • Good Morning, Ms. Renee. I don’t think the issue is with Northerners enjoying eating Southern Food. I lived up North for a spell and ate Southern Foods myself lol. I believe the issue is someone taking a recipe and it not being what they are saying it is due it has been mutilated by a person who has never eaten it nor understands the concept of how that specific recipe should be made or cooked. We ALL cook differently and that’s 100% fine. I like to adlib a small bit too…but it’s the ruining of a recipe and stating it’s a Southern Recipe and it’s not at all—Gumbo is one fine example of this. I am so happy you were able to enjoy traditional Southern food and that your parents are from the South–so you know what should be in a Southern Recipe and if it’s authentic or just BS.

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