Southern-Style Collard Greens

New Years Day is fast approaching and if you have Southern Roots, chances are you’ll be wanting to make a pot of these lucky nutrient enriched greens called, “Collard Greens” for a chance at better fortune since the leaves represent folded money in old Southern Folklore …

Collard greens have been a staple vegetable of the Southern U.S. cuisine for many years. They are often mixed with other similar green leafy vegetables, such as kale, turnip greens, spinach, and mustard greens.

Southern-Style Collard Greens

Most of us love to eat these tasty greens year-round in the Deep South. The Typical Southern flavorings and seasonings used in collard greens are smoked ham hocks, salted pork neckbones, fatback, smoked bacon, andouille sausage, diced onions, a smidge of vinegar, salt, and black, white, or crushed red, pepper, and a pinch of sugar to take the bitterness away if need be.

Traditionally, collards are eaten in by many on New Year’s Day, with black-eyed peas or field peas, and homemade cornbread, to ensure wealth in the coming year, as the leaves of the greens resemble folded money. Cornbread is often used to mop up the delicious pot liquids.

Can you believe; Ancient Greeks grew collard greens and kale, Romans, produced several varieties, including one with large leaves and stalks possessing a mild flavor? That means Collard greens have been eaten for at least 2000 years. Isn’t that just crazy? Well, crazy good apparently; so get those collard greens going.

Happy New Years from The McCallum Family…

New Years Day is fast approaching and if you have Southern Roots, chances are you'll be wanting to make a pot of these lucky nutrient enriched greens called, "Collard Greens" for a chance at better fortune in 2016; since the leaves represent folded money in old Southern Folklore ...

 

Ingredients needed to make Southern Collard Greens
  • 3 cups of low-sodium chicken broth
  • 3 cups of water
  • 1  large smoked ham hock
  • 3 slices of smoked thick cut bacon
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1  large yellow onion chopped
  • 5 cloves of garlic chopped
  • 3 pounds of fresh collard greens
  • 1 tablespoon of apple cider vinegar
  • a dash of hot sauce
  • 2 tablespoons of sugar, optional
  • 1 tablespoon of Cajun seasoning
  • 1/2 of a tablespoon of kosher salt
  • freshly ground pepper to own taste

5 from 10 votes
Southern-Style Collard Greens
Southern-Style Collard Greens
Prep Time
20 mins
Cook Time
1 hr
Total Time
1 hr 20 mins
 

New Years Day is fast approaching and if you have Southern Roots, chances are you’ll be wanting to make a pot of these lucky nutrient enriched greens called, “Collard Greens” for a chance at better fortune; since the leaves represent folded money in old Southern Folklore …

Course: Side Dish
Cuisine: Southern
Keyword: Collard Greens, Greens
Servings: 6 people
Author: Heidy L. McCallum
Ingredients
  • 3 cups low-sodium chicken broth
  • 3 cups water
  • 1 large smoked ham hock
  • 3-4 slices smoked bacon
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 large yellow onion chopped
  • 5 cloves garlic chopped
  • 3 pounds fresh collard greens cleaned, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon organic apple cider vinegar
  • 1 dash hot sauce or to taste
  • 2 tablespoons sugar optional
  • 1 tablespoon Cajun seasoning
  • kosher salt to own taste
  • freshly ground black pepper to own taste
Instructions
  1. Place 3 cups of low sodium chicken broth and 3 cups of water in a large stockpot and bring to a rolling boil.
  2. Add the smoked ham hock and thick sliced smoked bacon; simmer for about 15-20 minutes on medium heat.
  3. Meanwhile, wash the collard greens cleaning each leaf under cold running water until free of any unwanted debris.
  4. Fold each collard leaf in half, on a large cutting board and cut the leaf away from the stem.
  5. Next stack about 5 of the collard leaves together on your cutting board.
  6. Begin at one end and roll the leaves up tightly like a cigar. Then, cut long ways down the center of the rolled collard green leaves.
  7. Squeeze the cut sections back together, rotate and cut the roll into about 1/2 of an inch ribbon. Reserve the collard greens to the side till they are ready to cook.
  8. Place 2 tablespoons of butter in a metal skillet on medium heat and let it slowly melt, add the chopped onions and chopped garlic, cook for about 2-3 minutes on medium heat; or till softened.
  9. Add the collard greens to the large stockpot in 1/3 or 1/4 batches at a time, let them wilt down for about 2-3 minutes and then add another batch to the pot to do the same, till all collard greens are in the pot.
  10. Add the cooked onions and garlic at this time to the large stockpot.
  11. Next, add the apple cider vinegar, a dash of hot sauce, sugar, Cajun seasoning, kosher salt, and freshly ground pepper to own taste. Reduce the heat to low and let simmer about 45-55 minutes.
  12. Remove the ham hock and thickly sliced bacon from the collard greens at this time.
  13. Remove the collard greens from the stockpot with a slotted spoon; place in a serving dish, add as much of the wonderful juice as desired back to the greens.
  14. Serve with your favorite Southern main course and cornbread to mop up those juices.

 

 

© Heidy L. McCallum and The McCallum’s Shamrock Patch, 2018-2013. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material or photos without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner are strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Heidy L. McCallum and The McCallum’s Shamrock Patch with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. You may not copy and paste recipes to share on Social Platforms.

 

New Years Day is fast approaching and if you have Southern Roots, chances are you'll be wanting to make a pot of these lucky nutrient enriched greens called, "Collard Greens" for a chance at better fortune in 2016; since the leaves represent folded money in old Southern Folklore ...

12 thoughts on “Southern-Style Collard Greens”

Speak your mind and share your thoughts...

%d bloggers like this: