Bacon Cheddar Horseradish Deviled Eggs

If you’re a fan of The Classic Deviled Egg mixture, and love Bacon, Cheddar, and Horseradish my spicy Bacon Cheddar Horseradish Deviled Eggs are definitely going to hit the spot…They are a perfect menu item for  jazzing up things when serving appetizers to your family or guests.

#Bacon #Cheddar #Horseradish #DeviledEggsI was surprised to find out our beloved Deviled Eggs are deep-rooted in Ancient history, it is said that a rare collection of Roman recipes compiled sometime between the Fourth and Fifth Century AD, consisting of boiled eggs that were traditionally seasoned with olive oil, wine and/or broth served with pepper and laser was discovered in later years by Historians.

Another notable recipe that existed sometime between the Fourth and Fifth Century AD, compiled of poached eggs, dressed with soaked pine nuts, lovage (the medieval  name for parsley) pepper, honey, vinegar and broth. — The lovage plant is a wonderful ancient herb that has a hint of celery and a slight anise flavor that recently made a comeback in modern herb gardens.

In the 13th Century Stuffed Eggs would become endeared by Spain. Another Historical cookbook from this time period contained a recipe which gave directions to the would be cook to mix boiled egg yolks, cilantro, onion juice, pepper and coriander, then mix in a sauce made of fermented barley and/or fish, oil, and salt.

During the 15th Century Stuffed Eggs appeared all over Europe with many fillings that included herbs, raisins and other assorted stuffings. How ever the beloved term “Deviled” would not be used to refer to eggs till  the early 1800’s in Great Britain, when the term was used, it actually described any food item that was made spicy in taste by British Cooks.

Mayonnaise would not be included in our beloved Deviled Eggs in the United States by most, till around the early part of the 1900’s, and by WWII it would be very common to add mayonnaise, mustard and paprika to the egg yolk mixture. In the 2000’s Americans have taken them in a new direction by adding every known ingredient to man, I have decided to jump on the bandwagon myself today and add bacon, sharp cheddar, and horseradish to my recipe below.

Bacon Cheddar Horseradish Deviled Eggs

  • 5 slices hickory smoked bacon
  • 8 eggs
  • 1 and 1/2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
  • 4 tablespoons horseradish sauce
  • 3-4 tablespoons of shredded sharp cheddar
  • Pinch of kosher salt
  • Pinch cracked black pepper
  • extra sharp cheddar to garnish
  • 2 tablespoons chopped flat-leaf parsley, to garnish

Directions

Preheat oven to 400 degrees

Place the sliced bacon  on a cookie sheet  that has been lined for easier clean-up , bake until crisp, about 15 -18  minutes. Remove the bacon from oven, place on heat safe area to cool, blot excess oils with paper towel if needed.

Once cool roughly chop into large pieces 1×1 inches or slightly smaller, set to the side till you are ready to garnish the Deviled Eggs.

Put the eggs in a saucepan and cover them with  water. Bring the water to a boil over medium-high heat, then cover the saucepan with a tight fitting lid, turn off heat at this time. Let saucepan remain on burner for about 10 minutes.

Remove eggs from pan and place in extremely cold water which will quickly cool them down and make the eggs easier to peel.

Peel the eggs and cut in half. Remove the yolks from whites and place in a  bowl.  Add the horseradish sauce, Dijon mustard, 3-4 tablespoons of freshly grated sharp cheddar, salt, and pepper to egg yolks. Combine mixture until smooth and creamy.

Place the egg mixture into a piping bag, (You may also spoon mixture into egg whites if desired).  Arrange the egg whites on a serving platter. Utilizing a large Piping tip, pipe  a decent amount of the egg yolk mixture into each of the egg whites centers till full.

Garnish with bacon, freshly shredded sharp cheddar and flat leaf parsley.

 

 

© Heidy L. McCallum and The McCallum’s Shamrock Patch, 2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material or photos without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Heidy L. McCallum and The McCallum’s Shamrock Patch with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. You may not copy and paste recipes to share on Social Platforms.

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